Dr Kylie Dingwall

Program leader | Cognition and Brain Health

Qualifications:

PhD (Psychology), Charles Darwin University, 2010; Bachelor of Arts (Psychology, Honours), University of Queensland, 2004; Bachelor of Arts (Psychology), Griffith University, 2002.

Approved level of HDR supervision at Charles Darwin University:

Primary Supervisor for PhD

Location:

Alice Springs

Biography:

Dr Kylie Dingwall leads the Mental Health program of research in Alice Springs. She has lived and worked in Alice Springs for over 13 years in various roles, including child protection and Indigenous health research.

Kylie’s research focus includes identifying causes and risk factors for mental health and substance misuse problems, and then developing and trialling tools and interventions to help communities and individuals to stay strong along with discovering ways to overcome language and literacy barriers.  She has an interest in developing e-mental health and mental health literacy tools and currently leads projects investigating e-mental health implementation and effectiveness trials in an Indigenous setting. This work builds on the previous AIMhi body of research and includes the translation, testing and implementation of the AIMhi Stay Strong App.

Kylie also has an interest in cognition and brain health. Current brain research includes investigating the optimum dose of thiamine for treating and preventing brain impairments from thiamine deficiency/Wernicke Korsakoff’s syndrome and investigating the causes and risk factors for dementia among Aboriginal people living in aged care homes in Alice Springs. These projects build on previous research investigating the cognitive impacts of substance misuse and timeline for recovery with abstinence. Her work has also included examining the reliability and validity of cognitive and psychological assessment tools for Aboriginal people.
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Kylie has a strong interest in using the knowledge gained from previous research to inform the development of appropriate protocols and interventions for the detection and management of cognitive, substance misuse and mental health problems that can be used in primary health care practice.

 

  1. Dingwall, K. M., Pinkerton, J., & Lindeman, M. A. (2013). People like numbers: a descriptive study of cognitive assessment methods in clinical practice for Aboriginal Australians in the Northern Territory. BMC Psychiatry, 13(42), 13.
  2. Cairney, S., O'Connor, N., Dingwall, K. M., Maruff, P., Shafiq-Antonacci, R., Currie, J., & Currie, B. J. (2013). A prospective study of neurocognitive changes 15 years after chronic inhalant abuse. Addiction, 108, 1107-1114.
  3. Dingwall, K. M., Maruff, P., Clough, A. R., & Cairney, S. (2012). Factors associated with continued solvent use in Indigenous petrol sniffers following treatment. Drug and Alcohol Review, 31(1), 40-46.
  4. Dingwall, K. M., Maruff, P., & Cairney, S. (2011). Similar profile of cognitive impairment and recovery for Aboriginal Australians in treatment for episodic or chronic alcohol use. Addiction, 106(8), 1419-1426.
  5. Dingwall, K. M., Maruff, P., Fredrickson, A., & Cairney, S. (2011). Cognitive recovery during and after treatment for volatile solvent abuse. Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 118, 180-185.
  6. Dingwall, K. M., & Cairney, S. (2011). Recovery from central nervous system (CNS) changes following volatile solvent use (VSU). Substance Use and Misuse, 46(S1), 73-83.
  7. Dingwall, K. M., & Cairney, S. (2011). Detecting psychological symptoms related to substance misuse among Indigenous Australians. Drug and Alcohol Review, 30(1), 33-39.
  8. Dingwall, K. M., & Cairney, S. (2010). Psychological and cognitive assessment of Indigenous Australians. Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 44(1), 20-30.
  9. Dingwall, K. M., Lewis, M. S., Maruff, P., & Cairney, S. (2010). Assessing cognition following petrol sniffing for Indigenous Australians. Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 44(7), 631-639.
  10. Dingwall, K. M., Lewis, M. S., Maruff, P., & Cairney, S. (2009). Reliability of repeated cognitive assessment in healthy Indigenous Australian adolescents. Australian Psychologist, 44(1), 224-234.
Click here to view more Kylie Dingwall publications in PubMed.
  1. Tackling smoking in remote communities

    Tackling smoking in remote communities

    Date

    The development of Yarning about Smoking is a collaboration between the Health Department’s Remote Alcohol and Other Drugs Workforce Program in Primary Health Care and the Menzies School of Health Research

  2. NTG Media Release | Tackling smoking in remote communities

    NTG Media Release | Tackling smoking in remote communities

    Date

    The development of Yarning about Smoking is a collaboration between the Health Department’s Remote Alcohol and Other Drugs Workforce Program in Primary Health Care and the Menzies School of Health Research. The resource can be used and accessed by people all across the Health Department as well as the NGO sector to provide assessments and intervention with people who are smoking.

  3. Mental health app reaches out to Indigenous Australians

    Mental health app reaches out to Indigenous Australians

    Date

    A pioneering iPad app which visually represents an individual’s strengths and weakness is hoping to significantly improve Indigenous mental health; one of the nation’s fastest growing health problems.

  4. NHMRC project snapshot: Kylie Dingwall

    NHMRC project snapshot: Kylie Dingwall

    Date

    Menzies' postdoctoral research fellow, Dr Kylie Dingwall, was recently awarded a competitive grant as part of the National Health and Medical Research Council's (NHMRC) yearly multi-million dollar funding round.

  5. New app to improve Indigenous mental health featured on World Mental Health Day

    New app to improve Indigenous mental health featured on World Mental Health Day

    Attachment
    131010 MR_New app to improve Indigenous mental health FINAL.pdf

    An innovative iPad app based on tools developed by Indigenous people for Indigenous people is hoping to address one of the nation’s fastest growing health problems.

  6. Brains of the Desert

    Brains of the Desert

    Date

    Improving Indigenous mental health motivates the work, and the growing cult, of Central Australia’s Dr Kylie Dingwall.

  7. Study probes answers to memory loss for problem drinkers

    Study probes answers to memory loss for problem drinkers

    Attachment
    Thiamine study.pdf

    Menzies School of Health Research (Menzies) have announced a new project which could have global implications for preventing memory loss and other neurological problems for problem drinkers.