Belinda Davison

Project manager

Qualifications:

Master in Public Health, Charles Darwin University, 2012; Graduate Diploma in Public Health, Charles Darwin University, 2011; Diploma in Nursing, Royal Hobart Hospital, 1990.

Location:

Darwin - Royal Darwin Hospital campus

Biography:

Belinda has dedicated over 18 years to Indigenous health in both nursing and health research capacity in the Northern Territory. Her interest in Indigenous health and particularly early antecendents of chronic disease led to her joining the Aboriginal Birth Cohort (ABC) study.

Belinda was part of the successful Wave-3 data collection for ABC, and towards the end of that wave she was managing and coordinating the full project. She subsequently coordinated the recruitment of a non-Aboriginal Top End cohort study.

Currently she is the project manager of two life course studies and the Preterm Kidney study. She is involved in community consultation, oversees data collection and management and provides training, mentoring and support to junior staff and other colleagues.

  1. Sayers, S., Singh, G., Mackerras, D., Lawrance, M., Gunthorpe, W., Jamieson, L., et al. (2009). Australian Aboriginal Birth Cohort study: follow-up processes at 20 years. BMC International Health Human Rights, 9(23).
Click here to view more Belinda Davison publications in PubMed.
  1. On the road again: Nation's oldest and largest Aboriginal health study

    On the road again: Nation's oldest and largest Aboriginal health study

    Date

    The oldest and largest study of Aboriginal people in Australia has begun its fourth wave of data collection.

  2. 730NT: Tracking down Darwinites' health

    730NT: Tracking down Darwinites' health

    Date

    It's the nation's largest and longest-running study of Aboriginal people - and it's happening here in the Northern Territory.

  3. Rain, hail or shine - Landmark study rolls on

    Rain, hail or shine - Landmark study rolls on

    Date

    The largest, longest-running and most significant study of the lives of Indigenous babies born in Australia continued its fourth wave of data collection throughout 2014.