Dr Robyn Marsh

Senior research officer

Qualifications:

PhD, Charles Darwin University, 2012.

Approved level of HDR supervision at Charles Darwin University:

Associate Supervisor for Masters

Location:

Darwin - Royal Darwin Hospital campus

Biography:

Robyn’s research aims to improve understanding of microbial factors that contribute to the onset and progression of chronic lung and middle ear infections affecting Indigenous children. She is specifically interested in understanding how bacteria in complex polymicrobial communities contribute to the onset and progression of chronic mucosal infections.

Her research draws together bacterial, viral and biofilm studies to achieve better understanding of the microbial ecology of chronic respiratory infections. This includes application of emerging DNA sequencing technologies to characterize the structure and function of upper and lower airway bacterial communities. The long-term aim of this research is to determine how chronic respiratory infections can be prevented, and to identify potential targets for improved treatments.

Research Themes
  • Metagenomic sequencing of upper and lower airway specimens to characterise bacteria and viruses associated with chronic suppurative lung disease in Indigenous Australian children (Clive and Vera Ramaciotti Foundation)
  • Investigating the infectious processes underlying chronic suppurative lung disease in Indigenous Australian children (Channel 7 Children’s Research Foundation Grant)
  • Characterisation of bacteria and viruses associated with chronic suppuratives lung disease in Indigenous children (NHRMC Frank Fenner Early Career Fellowship)
  • Co-investigator on projects investigating the oral microbiome, respiratory pathogen whole genome sequencing and bacterial load measures in relation to otitis media and lower airway infections.
  1. Marsh, R.L., Binks, M.J., Beissbarth, J., Christensen, P., Morris, P.S., Leach, A.J. & Smith-Vaughan, H.C. (2012).  Quantitative PCR of ear discharge from Indigenous Australian children with acute otitis media with perforation supports a role for Alloiococcus otitidis as a secondary pathogen. BMC Ear, Nose and Throat Disorders, 12, 11.
  2. Chang, A.B., Marsh, R.L., Smith-Vaughan, H.C. & Hoffman, L.R. (2012). Emerging drugs for bronchiectasis. Expert Opinion On Emerging Drugs, 17(3), 361-378.
  3. Binks, M.J., Temple, B., Kirkham, L., Wiertsema, S., Dunne, E., Richmond, P., Marsh, R.L., et al. (2012). Molecular surveillance of true nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae: An evaluation of PCR screening assays. PLoS ONE, 7(3), e34083.
  4. Marsh, R.*, Smith-Vaughan, H.*, Hare, K.M., Binks, M., Kong, F., Warning, J., et al. (2010). The nonserotypeable pneumococcus: phenotypic dynamics in the era of anticapsular vaccines. Journal of Clinical Microbiology, 48(3), 831-835.  (*equal first authorship)
  5. Kirkham, L.A., Wiertsema, S.P., Smith-Vaughan, H.C., Thornton, R.B., Marsh, R.L., Lehmann, D., et al. (2010). Are you listening? The inaugural Australian Otitis Media (OMOZ) workshop -towards a better understanding of otitis media. Medical Journal of Australia,193(10), 569-571.
  6. Smith-Vaughan, H., Marsh, R.L. & Leach, A.J. (2009). Otitis media: an ongoing microbial challenge. Microbiology Australia, 30(5), 181-184.
  7. Marsh, R.*, Smith-Vaughan, H.*, Mackenzie, G., Fisher, J., Morris, P.S., et al. (2009). Age-specific cluster of cases of serotype 1 Streptococcus pneumoniae carriage in remote Indigenous communities in Australia. Clinical and Vaccine Immunology, 16(2), 218-21. (*equal first authorship)
  8. Marsh, R.L., Smith-Vaughan, H., Beissbarth, J., Hare, K., Kennedy, M., Wigger, C., et al. (2007). Molecular characterisation of pneumococcal serotype 16F: Established predominant carriage and otitis media serotype in the 7vPCV era. Vaccine, 25(13), 2434-2436.
  9. Marsh, R.L.*, Smith-Vaughan, H.C.*, Morris, P.S. & Leach, A.J. (2007). In vivo emergence of high-level macrolide resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae following a single dose of azithromycin. Journal of Clinical Microbiology, 45(12), 4090-4091. (*equal first authorship)
  10. Boutlis, C.S., Hobbs, M.R., Marsh, R.L., Misukonis, M.A., Tkachuk, A.N., Lagog, M., et al. (2003). Inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2) promoter CCTTT repeat polymorphism: relationship to in vivo nitric oxide production/NOS activity in an asymptomatic malaria-endemic population. The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 69(6), 569-573.
Click here to view more Robyn Marsh publications in PubMed.
  1. Territory researchers win national awards

    Territory researchers win national awards

    Date

    Two researchers from Menzies School of Health Research were recognised for their contribution to the science community at the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Gala Dinner held at Parliament House in Canberra last night.

  2. NHMRC features Menzies' researcher Robyn Marsh

    NHMRC features Menzies' researcher Robyn Marsh

    NHMRC Frank Fenner early career fellowship winner Robyn Marsh talks about her research experience.

  3. Large donation for vital research

    Large donation for vital research

    Date

    The generous staff at Darwin Airport have donated $13,000 to Menzies School of Health Research to go towards the purchase of Anaerobic Chamber.

  4. Anaerobic Chamber to help improve lives of Indigenous Children.

    Anaerobic Chamber to help improve lives of Indigenous Children.

    Date

    The Chamber is a crucial piece of equipment for growing anaerobic bacteria that can be found in children under the age of 5 with middle ear infections and chronic lung disease.