Dr Kalinda Griffiths

Honorary Research Fellow

Qualifications:

PhD (Epidemiology), University of Sydney, 2017; Master of Public Health, Charles Darwin University, 2010; Bachelor of Biomedical Science, Charles Darwin University, 2008; Cert. III Laboratory Techniques, Group Training NT, 2001

Approved level of HDR supervision at Charles Darwin University:

Associate Supervisor

Location:

Darwin - Royal Darwin Hospital

Biography:

Kalinda is a Scientia Fellow at the Centre for Big Data Research, UNSW. Kalinda’s work addresses complex health disparities in populations by using existing administrative data. She holds honorary positions at the University of Sydney and Menzies School of Health Research and is deputy editor of the Health Promotion Journal of Australia.

Her research currently addresses issues of quality and the utilisation of Indigenous data with a focus on data governance, measurement and cancer care and outcomes. Kalinda is the recipient of a number of awards. Notably, she was awarded the Northern Territory Young Australian of the Year in 2011 and more recently, the 2019 Lowitja Institute Emerging Researcher Award. She is also a 2019-2021 Science and Technology Australia Superstar of STEM.

  • Evidence-based approaches to developing data governance in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health research.
  • Pathways to Change: Building Biomedical Capability in Regional and Remote Northern Australia.
  • ARC Linkage Project - Investigating The Impacts Of The Banned Drinker Register Re-Introduction In The Northern Territory.
  • NHMRC Centre for Research Excellence - Targeted Approaches to Improve Cancer Services for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians (TACTICS).
  1. Smith JA., Herriot M., Williams C.,  Judd J.,  Griffiths K.,  Bainbridge R.,  (2019). Health Promotion: A political imperative. Health Promotion Journal of Australia. 30(2):133-136.
  2.  Griffiths, K., Coleman, C., Al-Yaman, F., Cunningham, J., Garvey, G., Whop, L., Jackson Pulver, L., Ring, Madden, R. (2019). The identification of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in official statistics and other data: critical issues of international significance. Statistical Journal of the IAOS. 35(1):91-106 doi: 10.3233/sji-180491
  3.  Smith, J., Judd, J., Bainbridge, R., Griffiths, K., D’Antoine, H., Cargo, M., Ireland, S. (2018). Are we going “co-crazy”? An opportunity to learn from health promotion foundations. Health Promotion Journal of Australia. 29(3):223-224.
  4.  Green, M., Anderson, K., Griffiths, K., Garvey, G., Cunningham, J. (2018). Understanding Indigenous Australians’ experiences of cancer care: Stakeholders’ views on what to measure and how to measure it. BMC, Health Services Research. 18:982.
  5.  Smith, J., Griffiths, K., Judd, J., Crawford, G., D’Antoine, H., Fisher, M., Bainbridge, R. (2018). Ten years on from the World Health Organisation Commission of Social Determinants of Health: Progress or procrastination? Health Promotion Journal of Australia. 29(1): 3-7.
  6. Coleman, C., Zhou Q., Griffiths, K., Madden, R. New South Wales Overcoming Indigenous Disadvantage 2017 (2018). Sydney Centre for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Statistics. The University of Sydney.
  7. Sarfati, D., Garvey, G., Robson, B., Moore, S., Cunningham, R., Withrow, D., Griffiths, K., Caron, N., Bray, F. (2018). Measuring cancer in Indigenous populations. Annals of Epidemiology. 28(5): 335-342.
  8.  Coleman, C., Fortune, N., Lee, V., Griffiths, K., Madden R. (2016). Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Life Expectancy and Mortality Trend Reporting. Sydney Centre for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Statistics. University of Sydney.  
  9. Griffiths, K., Coleman, C., Lee, V., Madden, R. (2016). How colonisation determines social justice and Indigenous health ‐ a review of the literature. Journal of Population Research. 33(1): 9‐30.

Click here to view more Kalinda Griffiths in PubMed.

  1. Healthy Tomorrow | Christmas edition 2019

    Healthy Tomorrow | Christmas edition 2019

    Date

    In this edition, we are proud to present a snapshot of the announcements, awards and events that have occurred over the past few months.

  2. Taking science to the parliament, to enrich the people

    Taking science to the parliament, to enrich the people

    Date

    The stakes are high at Science meets Parliament (SmP). They encompass the future of research and discovery in Australia.

  3. Ramaciotti Biomedical Award worth $1 million granted to Northern Territory research team

    Ramaciotti Biomedical Award worth $1 million granted to Northern Territory research team

    Date

    The biennial Ramaciotti Biomedical Research Award, worth $1 million, has been granted to a biomedical research team at the Menzies School of Health Research, based in Darwin.

  4. Ramaciotti Foundations recognise strides in Australian-based research

    Ramaciotti Foundations recognise strides in Australian-based research

    Date

    Professor Heidi Smith-Vaughan and her team at Menzies have been awarded the biennial Ramaciotti Biomedical Research Award, worth $1 million.

  5. Big data researcher wins Emerging Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Researcher Award

    Big data researcher wins Emerging Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Researcher Award

    Date

    Dr Kalinda Griffiths has won a major award from the Lowitja Institute for her research into health inequalities across Australia.

  6. Letís talk about counting our mob

    Letís talk about counting our mob

    Date

    The identification of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in official statistics.

  7. Menzies Superstars of Stem

    Menzies Superstars of Stem

    Date

    On a quiet Friday afternoon at Menzies, an emergency breaks out that only our #superstarsofSTEM can solve. An International Women's Day project.

  8. Menzies School of Health Research home to three superstars of STEM

    Menzies School of Health Research home to three superstars of STEM

    Date

    Three Menzies School of Health Research researchers are among the new round of 2019 Superstars of STEM.

  9. Measuring cancer in Indigenous populations

    Measuring cancer in Indigenous populations

    Date

    Researchers Dr Kalinda Griffiths, Dr Suzanne Moore and Professor Gail Garvey, explain why cancer surveillance in Indigenous populations can be prone to bias.