Sharon Thompson

Education coordinator, lecturer and researcher

Qualifications:

Master of Teaching, Charles Darwin University, 2005; Bachelor of Anthropology and Cultural Studies, Monash University, 1999.

Location:

Darwin - Charles Darwin University, Casuarina campus

Biography:
Sharon has taught and studied in remote Northern Territory communities; co-authored health promotion resources for an Indigenous audience; conducted a qualitative study looking at Aboriginal perspectives on physical activity in remote communities; and currently coordinates and teaches in the postgraduate public health program at Menzies. Her research interests include qualitative methods, cross-cultural communication and public health education. 
 
  1. Thompson, S.L., Chenhall, R.D., & Brimblecombe, J.K. (2013). Indigenous perspectives on active living in remote Australia: a qualitative exploration of the socio-cultural link between health, the environment and economics. BMC Public Health, 13(473).
  2. Thompson, S. (2010). Aboriginal Perspectives on Physical Activity in Remote Communities: Meanings and Ways Forward. Darwin, Australia: Menzies School of Health Research.
  3. Cairney, S., Fitz, J., Thompson, S., & Currie, J. (2009). The Gunja (Yarndi) Brain Story. Darwin, Australia: St Vincent’s Hospital Melbourne and Menzies School of Health Research.
  4. Cairney, S., Fitz, J., Thompson, S., & Currie, J. (2009). The Grog Brain Story. Darwin, Australia: St Vincent’s Hospital Melbourne and Menzies School of Health Research. 
Click here to view more Sharon Thompson publications in PubMed.
  1. Bio Med Central: Indigenous perspectives on active living in remote Australia

    Bio Med Central: Indigenous perspectives on active living in remote Australia

    Date

    Indigenous perspectives on active living in remote Australia: a qualitative exploration of the socio-cultural link between health, the environment and economics.

  2. Study examines new ways to promote active living in remote communities

    Study examines new ways to promote active living in remote communities

    Date

    Researchers at the Menzies have conducted the first ever detailed study documenting Indigenous perspectives on active living.