The National Indigenous Cancer Network (NICaN) is a partnership between the Menzies School of Health Research, the Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet, the Lowitja Institute and Cancer Council Australia.

NICaN was established in 2013 and aims to improve health services for Indigenous people with cancer. NICaN brings together Indigenous audiences, consumers, service providers, researchers and health professionals from a broad range of disciplines, as well as private sector and government organisations.

NICAN is a critical part of the translation of Indigenous cancer research into practice. It aims to ensure that what's known about cancer in Indigenous Australians is available for use by people with cancer, their families, practitioners, policy makers and researchers. This is achieved by using existing information, identifying knowledge gaps and encouraging and supporting collaboration in research and service provision.

NICaN’s activities are supported through two major research partnerships: The DISCOVER-TT Centre of Research Excellence and a Strategic Research Priority program, STREP-Ca-CIndA.

In addition to the links with these research partnerships, NICaN provides:

  • plain language information about cancer (click on the resources tab)
  • a dedicated Yarning Place discussion forum and Twitter account @NICaN Australia
  • the opportunity to attend annual network meetings and Indigenous Cancer Roundtables
  • support for Indigenous Cancer Ambassadors
  • cancer awareness events such as Walking the Talk Cancer Day 
  • policies and strategies that address cancer among Indigenous people
  • a comprehensive collection of publications, conference presentations and resources
  • information about training courses, workforce development and organisations that provide support for Indigenous people with cancer, their families and friends.

To access NICaN’s online portal, please visit CancerInfoNet.

Key staff:
Collaborators:

The National Indigenous Cancer Network (NICaN) has been established in partnership with:

  • Menzies School of Health Research
  • Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet
  • Lowitja Institute
  • Cancer Council Australia.

CancerInfoNet provides recent references compiled from HealthInfoNet’s bibliographic database addressing cancer among Indigenous peoples. References are divided into general and specific topics and include journal articles, reports, theses and other literature.

 Fact sheets:

The information in the fact sheets has been adapted for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people by Menzies School of Health Research in consultation with a Clinical Advisory Group and an Indigenous Consultation group. Production by Cancer Council.

Publications, policies and further resources are available via CancerInfoNet.

  1. Walking together for Indigenous Cancer

    Walking together for Indigenous Cancer

    Date

    Over 200 people walked in the inaugural Musgrave Park Cancer Walk at Musgrave Park, South Brisbane, on Sunday, 2 February 2014 to raise cancer awareness among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and encourage its prevention, detection, and treatment.

  2. NITV: Murri community hosts walk for cancer

    NITV: Murri community hosts walk for cancer

    Date

    Cancer survivors from the Murri community and surrounding health organisations have participated in the inaugural walk for cancer in Brisbane's Musgrave Park.

  3. National Indigenous News Service: Cancer awareness walk to be held in Brisbane

    National Indigenous News Service: Cancer awareness walk to be held in Brisbane

    Date

    A number of health organisations in Brisbane are collaborating to hold an event to raise awareness and dispel myths about cancer among Indigenous Australians.

  4. Ehospice - Cancer myths fuel fear amongst Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples

    Ehospice - Cancer myths fuel fear amongst Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples

    Date

    Over 200 people joined together at Musgrave Park in Brisbane on Sunday 2 February ahead of World Cancer Day to raise cancer awareness, prevention, early detection and treatment for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

  5. Indigenous kids face higher risk of childhood cancer death

    Indigenous kids face higher risk of childhood cancer death

    Date

    Indigenous Australian children are 36 per cent more likely to die within five years of a cancer diagnosis than non-Indigenous Australian children, a landmark new report has found.

  6. Study examines cancer survival statistics for Indigenous Australians

    Study examines cancer survival statistics for Indigenous Australians

    Date

    Cancer Council Queensland is calling for enhanced joint efforts to improve Indigenous cancer control following the release of research findings that cancer survival is lower for Indigenous than non-Indigenous Australians for all cancers combined, and for many specific types of cancer.

  7. Roundtable to improve cancer outcomes

    Roundtable to improve cancer outcomes

    Date

    Some of the countryís leading authorities on cancer and cancer survivors themselves were a key part of a National Indigenous Breast Cancer Research Roundtable held in August 2014.

  8. Rising stars in pioneering health research celebrated

    Rising stars in pioneering health research celebrated

    Date

    Menzies researcher Assoc Prof Gail Garvey was announced as the winner of the BUPA Health Foundation Emerging Health Researcher Award last night.

  9. NITV: Two months' could be key to Indigenous women's survival of cervical cancer

    NITV: Two months' could be key to Indigenous women's survival of cervical cancer

    Date

    NITV : A study lead by a young Torres Strait Islander research fellow finds that Indigenous women are not receiving the recommended 2-month clinical follow up on an abnormal pap test result.

  10. NT Aboriginal men fall behind in life expectancy

    Date

    National Indigenous Times reports on a study, published in the Medical Journal of Australia, found that between 1967 and 2012 the difference in life expectancies for NT Aboriginal women and the wider Australian population declined by 4.6 years.

  11. Indigenous women are less likely to survive breast cancer

    Indigenous women are less likely to survive breast cancer

    Date

    Prof. Gail Garvey from @MenziesHealth explains why Indigenous women are less likely to survive breast cancer than other women