Professor Ross Andrews

Research fellow

Qualifications:

PhD, Australian National University, 2004; Master of Applied Epidemiology, Australian National University, 1998; Master of Public Health, Monash University, 1995; Diploma of Applied Science (Environmental Health), Swinburne University, 1984.

Approved level of HDR supervision at Charles Darwin University:

Principal Supervisor for PhD

Location:

Brisbane Office, Queensland

Biography:

Professor Andrews is an epidemiologist with major research interests in vaccine-preventable diseases and skin infections.

He is a senior member of the Australian Partnership for Preparedness Research on InfectiouS disease Emergencies (APPRISE) and has a joint appointment as Director of the Masters of Applied Epidemiology (MAE) program at the Australian National University. The MAE is Australia’s field epidemiology training program. Ross has contributed to national immunisation policy for 10 years as a member the Australian Technical Advisory Group on Immunisation (ATAGI), including four years as Chair. His term on ATAGI ended on 30 June 2018. 

Ross has $24.2m in research funding; 116 peer-reviewed publications; supervised 11 higher degree by research (HDR) students to completion (five as primary supervisor) and currently supervises five HDR students.
 

Research Themes
Past Projects 
  1. Mchugh L, Marshall HS, Perrett KP Nolan T, Wood N, Lambert SB, Richmond P, Ware RS, Binks P, Binks MJ, Andrews RM (2018). The Safety of Influenza and Pertussis Vaccination in Pregnancy in a Cohort of Australian Mother-Infant Pairs, 2012-2015: The FluMum Study. Clin Infect Dis. 2018 Nov 23. doi: 10.1093/cid/ciy517.

  2. Moberley, S., Holden, J., Tatham, D. & Andrews, R. (2013). Vaccines for preventing pneumococcal infection in adults (Review). Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, 1, CD000422.
  3. Kearns, T., Clucas, D., Connors, C., Currie, B., Carapetis, J. & Andrews, R. (2013). Clinic Attendances during the First 12 Months of Life for Aboriginal Children in Five Remote Communities of Northern Australia. PLoS One, 8(3), e58231.
  4. Snelling, T., Andrews, R., Kirkwood, D., Culvenor, S. & Carapetis, J. (2011). Case-Control Evaluation of the Effectiveness of the G1P[8] Human Rotavirus Vaccine during an Outbreak of Rotavirus G2P[4]4 Infection in Central Australia. Clinical Infectious Diseases, 52(2), 191-199.
  5. O’Grady, K.A., Lee, K., Carlin, J., Torzillo, P., Change, A.B., Mulholland, E.K., Lambert, S. & Andrews, R. (2010). Increased risk of hospitalization for acute lower respiratory tract infection among Australian indigenous infant 5-23 month of age following pneumococcal vaccination: a cohort study. Clinical Infectious Diseases, 50(7), 970-978.
  6. O’Grady, K.A., Carlin, J., Chang, A.B., Torzillo, P., Noaln, T., Ruben, A. & Andrews, R. (2010). Effectiveness of 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine against radiologically diagnosed pneumonia in indigenous infants in Australia. World Health Organization Bulletin, 88(2). 139-146.
  7. Moberley, S., Krause, V., Cook, H., Mulholland, E.K., Carapetis, J., Torzillo, P. & Andrews, R. (2010). Failure to vaccinate or failure of vaccine? Effectiveness of the 23-valent pneumococcal plysaccharide vaccine program in Indigenous adults in the Northern Territory of Australia. Vaccine, 28(11), 2296-2301
  8. O’Grady, K.A., Krause, V. & Andrews, R. (2009). Immunisation coverage in Australian Indigenous children: Time to move the goal posts. Vaccine, 27(2), 307-312.
  9. Dunbar, M., Moberley, S., Nelson, S., Leach, A. & Andrews, R. (2007). Clear not simple: An approach to community consultation for a maternal pneumococcal vaccine trial among Indigenous women in the Northern Territory of Australia. Vaccine, 25(13), 2385-2388.
  10. Skull, S., Andrews, R., Byrnes, G., Kelly, H., Nolan, T., Brown, G. & Campbell, D. (2007). Prevention of community-acquired pneumonia among a cohort of hospitalized elderly: Benefit due to influenza and pneumococcal vaccination not demonstrated. Vaccine 25(23), 4631-4640.
Click here to view more Ross Andrews publications in PubMed.
  1. Research centre launches collaborative study into parechovirus – an emerging infection in infants

    Research centre launches collaborative study into parechovirus – an emerging infection in infants

    Date

    Researchers across Australia will work together to study an emerging virus that has caused three outbreaks of serious illness in infants since 2013. Parechovirus can cause sepsis-like and meningitis-like infection leading to developmental delays in severe cases.

  2. National Healthy Skin Guideline

    National Healthy Skin Guideline

    Date

  3. Research centre gets the green light to begin critical pandemic research

    Research centre gets the green light to begin critical pandemic research

    Date

    APPRISE researcher Professor Ross Andrews, an epidemiologist at the Menzies School of Health Research in Darwin, said effective and respectful engagement with communities rather than for them is critical to effective preparation for future pandemics.

  4. Mine workers to be used for heat study

    Mine workers to be used for heat study

    Date

    WORKERS at the Northern Territory’s McArthur River Mine will be the guinea pigs for a study by Menzies School of Health to determine the effects of heat stress on productivity.

  5. Menzies part of the Eureka Prize winning team

    Menzies part of the Eureka Prize winning team

    Date

    The Scabies Research Team, from Murdoch Childrens Research Institute; the Kirby Institute; St Vincent's Hospital Sydney; and Menzies School of Health Research, wins the 2017 Australian Infectious Diseases Research Centre Eureka Prize for Infectious Diseases Research.

  6. Positive Birth Outcomes For FLU Vaccine During Pregnacy

    Positive Birth Outcomes For FLU Vaccine During Pregnacy

    Date

    Almost 2500 women had the vaccination, while more than 4600 opted not to. Menzies School of Health Research PhD student and lead author Lisa McHugh said they found no clinically significant differences in infants’ birthweight or gestational age at birth between the two groups of women.

  7. Study shows the safety of flu vaccine during pregnancy

    Study shows the safety of flu vaccine during pregnancy

    Date

    An Australia-wide study published in the international journal Vaccine has provided reassuring evidence on the safety of influenza vaccination during pregnancy.

  8. AUSTRALIAN RESEARCHERS PLAY VITAL ROLE IN ADDRESSING THE GLOBAL SCABIES CRISIS

    AUSTRALIAN RESEARCHERS PLAY VITAL ROLE IN ADDRESSING THE GLOBAL SCABIES CRISIS

    Date

    In a world-first study, treatment of a whole community with oral ivermectin has been shown to virtually eliminate scabies, providing new hope in the fight to control this debilitating disease.

  9. Ten of the Best 2013

    Ten of the Best 2013

    Date

    A Menzies research project is part of ten of the best health and medical research projects underway in Australia today.

  10. Menzies rotavirus vaccine project recognised among Australia's best

    Menzies rotavirus vaccine project recognised among Australia's best

    Date

    A NT-based research project investigating the effectiveness of a vaccine to prevent severe diarrhoea in children has been recognised as one of the country’s ten best research projects for 2013.

  11. Sod turned for $46m research facility for leading Indigenous health institute

    Sod turned for $46m research facility for leading Indigenous health institute

    Date

    Federal Minister for Indigenous Affairs Warren Snowdon and Northern Territory Minister for Health Kon Vatskalis have turned the ‘first sod’ in celebration of the Menzies School of Health Research new multimillion dollar building project.

  12. ABC stateline report - beating scabies and strongyloidiasis

    ABC stateline report - beating scabies and strongyloidiasis

    Date

    The Menzies School of Health Research is hoping the drug Ivermectin will rid the Echo Island community, east of Darwin, of scabies and the strongyloides worm.