John McKenzie

Senior research officer

Qualifications:

PhD, University of Melbourne, 1997; Master of Applied Science, University of Melbourne, 1995; Bachelor of Science (Honours), University of Melbourne, 1986.

Approved level of HDR supervision at Charles Darwin University:

Principal Supervisor for PhD

Location:

Darwin Charles Darwin University, Casuarina campus

Biography:

John’s career has comprised several threads (data analysis, youth work and community development) that have come together in his work at the Centre for Child Development and Education (CCDE).

He is currently co-managing the Child Development and Education Research Partnership.

This is a research partnership between Menzies, AMSANT (the peak body for Indigenous controlled health boards) and the NT government departments of Education, Health, and Children and Families.

The project is linking de-identified health, education, child protection and police data on over 60,000 NT children. This enables researchers to study relationships and connections impossible to see until data from different sources are combined.   

John’s formal qualifications are in mathematics and the analysis of spatio-temporal data. He was a postgraduate student and lecturer at the University of Melbourne and then postdoctoral fellow and lecturer at Auckland University.

Before this period he worked in refuges for homeless youth in central Sydney.

He has lived and worked in remote Indigenous communities in a variety of roles including community development and mentoring Indigenous businesses, health boards and local councils.

  1. Silburn, S.R., McKenzie, J.W. & Moss, B. (2010). Northern Territory Results for the Australian Early Development Index 2009. Darwin: Northern Territory Department of Education and Training.
  2. Silburn, S.R., Nutton, G.D., McKenzie, J.W. & Landrigan, M. (2011). Early years English language acquisition and instructional approaches for Aboriginal students with home languages other than English: A systematic review of the Australian and international literature 2011. Darwin: Menzies School of Health Research.