World Indigenous Cancer Conference
12 - 14 April 2016 
Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre 
Queensland, Australia

The inaugural World Indigenous Cancer Conference 2016 (WICC) was attended by over 300 delegates from across the globe who came to Connect, Communicate and Collaborate to reduce Indigenous cancer disparities and address the considerable cancer burden affecting Indigenous peoples around the world. A wide range of researchers, public health practitioners, clinicians, nurses, advocacy groups, allied health and other related professionals, and Indigenous community groups and leaders joined together for three days. 

WICC 2016 is supported by a Strategic Research Partnership Grant funded by Cancer Council New South Wales (STREP CaCIndA) and the NHMRC Centre for Research Excellence in Discovering Indigenous Strategies to Improve Cancer Outcomes Via Engagement, Research Translation, and Training (DISCOVER-TT). 

Why did we organise the inaugural World Indigenous Cancer Conference?

WICC 2016 provided opportunities to foster new collaboration, enhance capacity and share knowledge and information about cancer and Indigenous people internationally.

Our aim is to reduce Indigenous cancer disparities. Through WICC 2016 we brought together Indigenous communities and experts working in a variety of disciplines to discuss the latest findings in the field and to stimulate the development of international collaborations and encourage high-quality cancer research.

 

'Connecting, Communicating, and Collaborating across the Globe'

For a full program of sessions and speakers download the full WICC 2016 program here

Program extras

A number of extra events were available throughout WICC 2016 including:

Pre-conference Workshop – Racism and Health Workshop: Learnings for Cancer – facilitated by Professor David R Williams, Harvard University USA and Dr Naomi Priest, Australian National University, Australia. 

The Welcome Reception, including an energising performance from Torres Strait Islander Malu Kiai Mura Buai dancers.

The Conference Dinner, with special guest Archie Roach with an incredible performance that moved most delegates to tears.

A Yarning Circle, which included a number of guest storytellers, with the aim to connect people from across the world to share their stories.

Lunchtime seminar – Putting the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cancer Framework into practice – hosted by Major Sponsor, Cancer Australia. 

Early Morning Symposiums:

  1. The Renewal of the National Cervical Screening Program in Australia: What are the key issues for Indigenous women in the transition of the program to primary HPV screening? Presented by Ian Hammond and Karen Canfell.
  2. With and for First Nations, Inuit and Métis: Using a caucus model to advance cancer control in Canada, with representatives from Canadian Partnership Against Cancer Board of Directors, Assembly of First Nations, Métis National Council, and Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami
  3. Indigenous tobacco smoking and cancer prevention – global opportunities for knowledge translation using traditional and innovative arts and media based research, with a panel including Gillian Gould, David Copley, Marewa Glover, Linda Burhansstipanov, and Moana Tane

Profiled local Indigenous artists

Throughout WICC 2016 we showcased local Indigenous artists, including:

Andrew Gall

Andrew Gall is a pakana (Aboriginal man) from lutruwita (Tasmania), creating under his spirit guide name, kurina. A defining feature of Andrew’s work is the intricate nature in which he does his fine dot work in his paintings, and the delicate pieces he creates from fine metals like sterling silver, gold and copper. Andrew tells stories with every piece he creates from his personal and spiritual past, as well as that of his land and culture. 

Jordana Angus

Jordana Angus is a proud Wiradjuri woman and her traditional land is Narrandera, N.S.W. Jordana takes great pride in the diversity and quality of her work, which has seen a recent introduction of contemporary abstract pieces. This has translated over to her enamelled jewellery and her artworks incorporating both paint and coloured pens, all of which make a bold statement in personal style. 

Tori-Jay Mordey

Tori-Jay Mordey is a 21 year old Indigenous Australian illustrator working with Magabala Books. Tori-Jay illustrated Bakir and Bi which won the 2012 National Indigenous Australian ‘Black & Write’ Competition, was nominated for the 2013 Deadly Awards and chosen for the White Raven International Youth Library. Studying her final year in a Bachelor of Contemporary Australian Indigenous Art at Griffith University, Tori-Jay hopes to enrich her knowledge and develop her own style to inspire others and make a difference in how we tell our stories.

 

Menzies School of Health Research congratulates the following individuals who have been recognised for their outstanding efforts in the area of cancer care and awareness for Indigenous people.

Advocacy/Consumer Awards presented to:

  • Uncle Bill Buchanan
  • Sandra Miller

Advocacy/Consumer Award finalists:

  • David Copley
  • Colleen Lavelle
  • Aunty Marg Lawton
  • Robin Payne
  • Adelaide Saylor

Menzies School of Health Research congratulates the following individuals who have been nominated for the Emerging Researcher Award. This award recognises these individuals as leading new researchers in the field of cancer as it relates to Indigenous peoples, and that their research has begun to make an impact in improving outcomes for Indigenous populations with cancer.

Emerging Researcher Awarded to:

  • Lisa Whop

Emerging Researcher Award finalists:

  • Melissa McLeod
  • Virginia Signal
  • Diana Withrow

 

Foundation partner:
 

 

This conference is partially funded as part of a Strategic Partnership grant, STREP CaCIndA.

Patron sponsor:

Major sponsor:

Sponsor:

Conference App:

Supporter:

Yarning Circle Sponsor:

 
WICC 2016 Conference Host:

Menzies School of Health Research
Tel: +61 7 3169 4214
Fax: +61 8 8946 8464
Email: Bronwyn.Morris@menzies.edu.au

Postal address:
PO Box 10639
Brisbane, QLD, 4000
Australia

Office address:
Level 1, 147 Wharf Street
Spring Hill, QLD, 4000
Australia

 

Please use this link to access the photos from WICC 2016: http://wicc2016.pixieset.com/

Please click on the below PDFs to view the presentations. Note that not all presentations and videos are available for publication.

Tuesday 12th April 2016 9.00 - 11.00

Plenary 1 - Opening Plenary  Chaired by Gail Garvey, Menzies School of Health Research (Australia)

  1. Understanding and addressing health inequities in cancer: challenges and opportunities
    David R Williams, Harvard University (USA)
  2. Smoking and Prevention
    Tom Calma AO, Consultant to Commonwealth Department of Health (Australia)
  3. Global cancer burden: the necessity for prevention and early detection
    Christopher Wild, International Agency for Research on Cancer (France)

Tuesday 12th April 2016 11.30 - 13.00

1.1 Epidemiology 1 Chaired by Raj Supramaniam, Cancer Council New South Wales, Australia

  1. Establishing the capacity for Indigenous South Australians to benefit from cancer care: Developing and piloting an Advanced Cancer Data System (ACaDS)
    David Banham, SAHMRI (Australia)
  2. Head and neck cancers (HNC) among Indigenous Australians living in Queensland, 1997-2012
    Susanna Cramb, Cancer Council Queensland (Australia)
  3. Disparities in Cancer Incidence between Indigenous and Non-Indigenous Adults in Canada: Follow up of the 1991 Canadian Census Cohort
    Diana Withrow, Cancer Care Ontario (Canada)
  4. Cancer incidence in indigenous people in Australia, New Zealand, Canada, and the USA: a comparative population-based study
    Suzanne Moore, Menzies School of Health Research (Australia)
  5. Gaps in cancer treatment and outcomes for Aboriginal people in New South Wales, Australia
    Dianne O’Connell, Cancer Council New South Wales (Australia)
  6. Incidence and mortality of cancer in Greenlandic Inuit 1983-2012 – including a comparison with the Nordic countries
    Umbreen Yousaf, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen (Denmark)

Tuesday 12th April 2016 11.30 - 13.00

1.2 Leadership and Partnership 1 Chaired by Linda Burhansstipanov, Native American Cancer Research Corporation, USA

  1. Mino Pimatisiwin: Shifting control over cancer prevention intergenerationally
    Brenda Elias, University of Manitoba (Canada)
  2. Working together: accessing and managing First Nations health information through community-government partnerships
    Bonnie Healy, Alberta First Nations Information Governance Centre (Canada)
  3. An Indigenous Cancer Roundtable as a Way Forward in Canada
    Malcolm King, Simon Fraser University (Canada)
  4. Cancer narratives: Aboriginal Community engagement, cancer awareness, and education through research
    Neville Fazulla, CanDAD Aboriginal Community Reference Group (Australia)
  5. Hei Āhuru Mōwai, Māori Cancer Leadership Aotearoa
    Gary Thompson, Hei Ahuru Maori Cancer Leadership Aotearoa (New Zealand)

Tuesday 12th April 2016 11.30 - 13.00

1.3 Poster and mini-oral session, Chaired by Patricia Valery, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute (Australia)

  1. Knowing what is important - a theory of change for improving equity in breast, cervical and bowel cancer screening
    Rachael Andersen, Department of Health and Human Services (Australia)
  2. Finding the right fit between a national screening program and the needs of Indigenous communities: Promising signs for program adaption
    Jenny Brands, Menzies School of Health Research (Australia)
  3. Understanding access to healthcare services through geospatial visualisation of barriers and enablers for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander populations
    Darren Clinch, Department of Health and Human Services (Australia)
  4. Communication, Health Professionals, and Aboriginal Cancer Patients
    Gwenda Gilligan, Menzies School of Health Research (Australia)
  5. Towards systematic monitoring of the experiences of care of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with cancer: Phase One
    Monica Green, Menzies School of Health Research (Australia)
  6. The potential utility of the mortality to incidence ratio complement as a proxy for cause-specific survival in an Indigenous population
    Kalinda Griffiths, University of Sydney (Australia)
  7. Distribution of cancer-related characteristics for childhood central nervous system tumors among American Indian and white children in Oklahoma
    Amanda Janitz, Southern Plains Tribal Health Board (USA)
  8. Enduring and emerging challenges of Cancer Clinical Trials involving Australian Indigenous patients in the Northern Territory
    Rama Jayaraj, Charles Darwin University (Australia)
  9. To determine the frequency of histological types and common sites of oral cancer among Mullu Kuruma, Paniya and Kattunaikka tribes
    Dexton Johns, Non Govt Non Profit Organisation-Abhilash Dental Clinic (India)
  10. Implementing STARS in Indian Country: Observations and Experiences
    Scott Leischow, Mayo Clinic (USA)
  11. Patient-reported outcomes for Aboriginal people with cancer: lessons learnt assessing health-related quality of life in South and Central Australia
    Jasmine Micklem, Wardliparingga Aboriginal Health Research Unit, South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute (Australia)
  12. Head and neck cancer and its association with tobacco chewing habits in Paniya tribes of India
    Shanavas Palliyal, DM Wayanad Institute of Medical Sciences (India)
  13. Women’s Wellness Day: An innovative collaborative approach to improve cancer screening and uptake among Indigenous Women
    Kim Passante, Carbal Medical Centre (Australia)
  14. Improving Psycho-Oncology in Australia: From principles to practice with the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cancer Framework
    Sophia Wooldridge, Psycho-Oncology Service, Calvary Mater Hospital Newcastle (Australia

Tuesday 12th April 2016 14.00 - 15.30
Auditorium

Plenary 2 - Cancer Continuum Part 1: screening & prevention, early detection Chaired by Karen Canfell, Cancer Council New South Wales (Australia)

  1. Preventing cancer care through vaccination; are we seizing the opportunity?
    Julia Brotherton, Victorian Cytology Service (Australia)
  2. Cervical Screening among Indigenous women
    Lisa Whop, Menzies School of Health Research (Australia)
  3. Access, services & policy
    Angeline Letendre, Alberta Health Services (Canada)
  4. Cancer registration
    Freddie Bray, International Agency for Research on Cancer (France)

Tuesday 12th April 2016 15.30 - 17.00

2.1  Screening 1 Chaired by David Roder, University of South Australia (Australia) and Sandra Miller, CanDAD Aboriginal Community Reference Group (Australia)

  1. Mana Wahine - Community based breast and cervical screening for indigenous Maori women
    Tira Albert, Mana Wahine (New Zealand)
  2. Sisters doing it for themselves: developing a safe and acceptable self-collection model for cervical cancer screening
    Kerry Arabena, University of Melbourne (Australia)
  3. Good news stories to promote screening for breast and cervical cancer
    Jessica Delaney, Cancer Institute NSW (Australia)
  4. It’s time for your next breast screen: transitioning from pilot to sustainable screening model
    Nikki McGrath, BreastScreen Victoria (Australia)
  5. Effective colorectal cancer screening navigation education and outreach
    Joy Rivera, American Indian Cancer Foundation (USA)
  6. Improving Cancer Screening Participation in Under Screened Populations: A Community-Driven Approach
    Nisha Srinivasan, Cancer Council Victoria (Australia)

Tuesday 12th April 2016 15.30 - 17.00

2.2 Palliative Care Chaired by Patsy Yates, Queensland University of Technology (Australia)

  1. Development of palliative care educational resources to support patients, caregivers and health professionals for Indigenous populations in Ontario
    Diana Withrow, Cancer Care Ontario (Canada)
  2. Increasing understanding of palliative care in Aboriginal Health Workers: The PEPA West Australian Story
    Alicia King, Cancer Council Western Australia (Australia)
  3. A Cultured Approach To End Of Life Care
    Helen-Anne Manion, Dying at Home (Australia)
  4. Indigenous and non-Indigenous patients who used palliative care services in Australia from July 2011 to June 2014: A descriptive study
    Jade Newton, University of Western Australia (Australia)
  5. Innovative approaches in the delivery of end-of-life care for Indigenous people: An integrative review of published literature
    Shaouli Shahid, University of Western Australia (Australia)
  6. End of Life care for Aboriginal people with cancer in New South Wales, Australia
    Rajah Supramaniam, Cancer Council New South Wales (Australia)

Tuesday 12th April 2016 15.30 - 17.00

2.3 Resource and Program Development 1 Chaired by Brenda Elias, University of Manitoba (Canada)

  1. Stand Up Bro, Tane Takitu Ake
    Wayne Borell, Cancer Society Waikato/Bay of Plenty Division (New Zealand)
  2. Native American Cancer Education for Survivors: Findings and Support Resources
    Linda Burhansstipanov, Native American Cancer Research Corporation (USA)
  3. Closing the prostate cancer gap: a new resource to promote discussion and awareness about prostate cancer amongst Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities
    Katie Dundas, Prostate Cancer Foundation of Australia (Australia)
  4. Translating Health and Arts for New Knowledge and Understanding: using experiential arts to explore tobacco smoking within Indigenous communities
    Gillian Gould, University of Newcastle (Australia)
  5. Localised Culturally Safe Cancer Resources: connecting Indigenous Cancer Patients and Staff for 3rd largest Health Service in Australia
    Rose Wadwell, HNELHD (Australia)
  6. Supporting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples with lung cancer and their communities
    Isabella Wallington, Cancer Australia (Australia)

Wednesday 13th April 2016 9.00 - 10.30

Plenary 3 - Engaging with communities and patients Chaired by Scott Leischow, Mayo Clinic (USA) and Deborah Woods, Geraldton Regional Aboriginal Medical Service (Australia)

  1. Engaging with communities and patients: Native Sisters (Native Patient Navigators, Survivorship Navigators)
    Linda Burhansstipanov, Native American Cancer Research Corporation (USA)
  2. Engaging Well with Aboriginal women in WA - encouraging breast screening and more
    Leanne Pilkington, BreastScreen WA (Australia)
  3. Elders & cancer
    John Waldon, 2 Tama Limited (New Zealand)
  4. Palliative Care
    Patsy Yates, Queensland University of Technology (Australia)

Wednesday 13th April 2016 11.00 - 12.30

3.1 Methods Chaired by Dianne O'Connell, Cancer Council NSW (Australia)

  1. Realising Indigenous Australians capacity to benefit from cancer care: Developing person-centred performance measures in cancer control
    David Banham, SAHMRI (Australia)
  2. A Whole Genome Sequencing Approach to the identification of the genetic contributors to a Vulvar Cancer Cluster in Indigenous Women
    Jo Dickinson, Menzies Institute for Medical Research (Australia)
  3. The use of linked data to better understand health inequities: The story of lung cancer and Indigenous people in NSW
    Kalinda Griffiths, University of Sydney (Australia)
  4. Collaboration for commercial smoke-free environments: A social network analysis of Navajo Coalition
    Scott Leischow, Mayo Clinic (USA)
  5. A new measure of Aboriginal Community Engagement (ACE) and its relationship with health service use in New South Wales, Australia
    Rajah Supramaniam, Cancer Council New South Wales (Australia)
  6. Theoretical Reflections: Can realist evaluation and the PEN-3 model elucidate Aboriginal Australians cancer narratives?
    Paul Yerrell, NHMRC Cancer Data and Aboriginal Disparities (CanDAD) Project (Australia)

Wednesday 13th April 2016 11.00 - 12.30

3.2 Psychosocial care Chaired by Alison Hocking, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre (Australia)

  1. National assessment of the Supportive Care Needs of Indigenous Cancer Patients: preliminary results of a cross-sectional study
    Christina Bernardes, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute (Australia)
  2. Supportive care needs among newly diagnosed Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cancer patients: the silver lining for patients with comorbidity
    Abbey Diaz, Menzies School of Health Research (Australia)
  3. Quality of Life among Indigenous Australians with Cancer
    Gail Garvey, Menzies School of Health Research (Australia)
  4. Complexities of head and neck cancer: Health-related quality of life concerns reported by Aboriginal patients in South and Central Australia
    Jasmine Micklem, Wardliparingga Aboriginal Health Research Unit, South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute (Australia)
  5. Unmet supportive care needs of Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders with cancer: a prospective, longitudinal study
    Patricia Valery, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute (Australia)
  6. Risk for psychological distress among cancer patients with a familial history of Indian Residential School attendance
    Maike van Niekerk, Dalhousie University (Canada)

Wednesday 13th April 2016 11.00 - 12.30

3.3 Resource and Program Development 2 Chaired by Sandra Thompson, WA Centre for Rural Health, University of Western Australia (Australia)

  1. Findings: the Walking Forward American Indian Survivorship Physical Activity Pilot Program
    Linda Burhansstipanov, Native American Cancer Research Corporation (USA)
  2. Knowledge Translation and Education: Dialogue and storywork in support of First Nations, Inuit and Métis cancer patients throughout Oncology and Primary Care transition experiences
    Andre Corriveau, Department of Health & Social Services, Government of the Northwest Territories (Canada)
  3. Not enough time or was the time not right? Exploring the use of bowel cancer screening educational resources
    Margaret Haigh, Western Australian Centre for Rural Health (Australia)
  4. Does Digital Storytelling Improve Cancer Prevention and Decrease Medical Mistrust in American Indians?
    Emily Haozous, University of New Mexico College of Nursing (USA)
  5. Listen You Women Your Breasts Are Precious
    Dawn Ross, Batchelor Institute (Australia)
  6. Localised Oncology “Closing the Gap” Videos: connecting Indigenous Cancer Patients and Staff in a Regional Australian Cancer Centre
    Rose Wadwell, HNELHD, (Australia)

Wednesday 13th April 2016 13.30 - 15.00

Plenary 4 - Cancer Continuum Part 2: Diagnosis & care Chaired by Ian Olver, University of South Australia (Australia)

  1. Diagnosis & Patterns of Care
    Judith Salmon Kaur, Mayo Clinic (USA)
  2. Uneven playing fields: how pathways of care and comorbidity result in inequities in cancer outcomes
    Diana Sarfati, University of Otago (New Zealand)
  3. Health disparities in rural and remote areas
    Nadine Caron, UBC Faculty of Medicine’s School of Population and Public Health (Canada)

Wednesday 13th April 2016 15.30 - 17.00

4.1 Treatment 1 Chaired by Siddhartha Baxi, South West Radiation Oncology Service (Australia)

  1. Racial and Regional Referral Patterns to a CoC Accredited Facility for Cancer Management
    Janis Campbell, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center
  2. A Healing Culture: Aboriginal Cancer Warriors Respond to Cancer
    Linda Day, Aboriginal Mother Centre Society (Canada)
  3. Characteristics and care pathways of Indigenous Australians at Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre: A retrospective audit
    Allison Drosdowsky, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre (Australia)
  4. Cancer Inequalities for Mãori: the journey and clinical decision-making
    Louise Signal, University of Otago, Wellington (New Zealand)
  5. Indigenous inequities in the stomach cancer treatment pathway in New Zealand
    Virginia Signal, University of Otago, Wellington (New Zealand)
  6. Who goes where?: Treating Indigenous patients in cancer services in Australia
    Sandra Thompson, WA Centre for Rural Health, University of Western Australia (Australia)

Wednesday 13th April 2016 15.30 - 17.00

4.2 Leadership and Partnership 2 Chaired by Malcolm King, Simon Fraser University (Canada)

  1. The knowledge is in the room: Government-community partnerships for cancer prevention and support in the Northwest Territories
    Andre Corriveau, Department of Health & Social Services, Government of the Northwest Territories (Canada)
  2. The NETwork! Roadmap for Genomic Research and Mãori Engagement in New Zealand
    Kimiora Henare, Auckland Cancer Society Research Centre (New Zealand)
  3. Rethinking cancer, raising hope: Understanding Aboriginal cancer care in Victoria
    Alison Hocking, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre (Australia)
  4. First Nations and Alberta Health Services Cancer Care Initiative and Partnership
    Angeline Letendre, Alberta Health Services (Canada)
  5. Cancer Society Wellington - Policy, Governance and Action
    Christine Pihema, Cancer Society Wellington Division (New Zealand)
  6. Bridging the divide: Cross-cultural collaboration in the development and delivery of cancer services with and for Aboriginal people
    Rick Shipp, SNSWLMD (Australia)

Wednesday 13th April 2016 15.30 - 17.00

4.3 Education and Training Chaired by Vikki Knott, Menzies School of Health Research

  1. Ten years, 177 Health Workers and 72 Communities - Kicking goals for cancer education
    Amber Copland, Cancer Council Queensland (Australia)
  2. Development and evaluation of a cancer education course for Aboriginal Health Professionals
    Louise De Busch, Cancer Council Western Australia (Australia)
  3. More than knowing about cancer - cancer control education for Aboriginal Health Workers
    Anne-Marie Dewar, Menzies School of Health Research (Australia)
  4. To accredit or not accredit cancer education training? Lessons learnt from Aboriginal cancer education initiatives in South Australia
    Carmel McNamara, Cancer Council South Australia (Australia)
  5. Building blocks and stepping stones: reflections from the Yarning about cancer project in South Australia
    Carmel McNamara, Cancer Council South Australia (Australia)
  6. The Development of a National Indigenous Cancer Network - lessons learned
    Matthew Plant, Menzies School of Health Research (Australia)

Thursday 14th April 2016 9.00 - 10.30

Plenary 5 - Wellness and survivorship Facilitated by Jacinta Elston, James Cook University (Australia)

  1. The patient and doctor conversation
    Archie Roach and Louis Irving (Australia)
  2. Wellness, in the context of illness
    Alexandra King, Simon Fraser University (Canada)

Thursday 14th April 2016 11.00 - 12.30

5.1  Epidemiology 2 Chaired by Loraine Marrett, Cancer Care Ontario (Canada)

  1. Quantifying changes in the survival inequality for Indigenous people diagnosed with cancer in Queensland, Australia
    Peter Baade, Cancer Council Queensland (Australia)
  2. Addressing variations in outcomes for Indigenous women with breast cancer in Australia
    Jennifer Chynoweth, Cancer Australia (Australia)
  3. The great divide: Remoteness of residence and cancer survival differentials for Indigenous persons in Queensland
    Susanna Cramb, Cancer Council Queensland (Australia)
  4. Two ends of the Indigenous cancer control spectrum from Aotearoa/New Zealand
    Nina Scott, University of Auckland (New Zealand)
  5. Cancer survival and summary stage among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples - The impact of socio-economic disadvantage and remoteness
    Hanna Tervonen, University of South Australia (Australia)
  6. Disparities in cancer survival between Indigenous and non-Indigenous adults in Canada: Follow-up of the 1991 Canadian census cohort
    Diana Withrow, Cancer Care Ontario (Canada)

Thursday 14th April 2016 11.00 - 12.30

5.2 Consumer voices Chaired by Kalinda Griffiths, University of Sydney (Australia)

  1. When is cancer not a death sentence for Indigenous Men?
    Mick Adams, Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet (Australia)
  2. Cancer Stories of New Zealand: Key findings from Mãori families
    Tira Albert, Mana Wahine (New Zealand)
  3. “This strange world that is cancer”: Experiences of cancer patients in the Aotearoa/New Zealand health system
    Cheryl Davies, Tu Kotahi Maori Asthma Trust (New Zealand)
  4. Understanding the needs of Aboriginal adolescents and young adults impacted by cancer: utilising narratives to improve support services
    Fiona McDonald, Canteen (Australia)
  5. “I’m a survivor”: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cancer patients follow up care
    Judith Meiklejohn, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute (Australia)
  6. Using narrative data for continuous quality improvement of cancer care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in South Australia
    Rachel Reilly, SAHMRI (Australia)

Thursday 14th April 2016 11.00 - 12.30

5.3 Screening 2 Chaired by Ian Hammond, Department of Health (Australia)

  1. A regional Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service clinic combines community trust, capacity building and perseverance to significantly increase cervical screening
    Sandy Anderson, Ballarat and District Aboriginal Cooperative (Australia)
  2. Great Walls of Vagina - Aboriginal PapScreen comedy. Applying performing arts to engage the Victorian Aboriginal community about cervical screening
    Justine Holmes, Cancer Council Victoria (Australia)
  3. Factors Influencing the Utilization of Cancer Screening Services in Indigenous Peoples in the Canadian Arctic: Results of the ACCESS project
    Fariba Kolahdooz, Aboriginal and Global Health Research Group, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta (Canada)
  4. Colorectal cancer screening: how will it impact on Mãori?
    Melissa McLeod, University of Otago, Wellington (New Zealand)
  5. Applying an integrated strategy to increase breast screening for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women in Victoria
    Anne O’Callaghan, BreastScreen Victoria (Australia)
  6. Survey results point to interventions to increase mammographic screening in non-adherent American Indian women of one tribe
    Wesley Petersen, Mayo Clinic (USA)

Thursday 14th April 2016 13.30 - 15.00

6.1 Risk Factors Chaired by Alwin Chong, University of Adelaide (Australia)

  1. How are Australian General Practitioners Assisting Indigenous Pregnant Women to Quit?
    Yael Bar Zeev, University of Newcastle (Australia)
  2. “Our Smoking and Smoke-Free Stories” by Aboriginal women
    Michelle Bovill, University of Newcastle (Australia)
  3. Dispensation of drug regimens to treat Helicobacter pylori infection in First Nations and Inuit peoples in Alberta, Canada
    Amy Colquhoun, University of Alberta (Canada)
  4. Smoking in pregnancy among Indigenous women in high income countries
    Gillian Gould, University of Newcastle (Australia)
  5. A new approach to HPV immunisation for Victorian Aboriginal adolescents
    Heather O’Donnell, Cancer Council Victoria (Australia)
  6. A Killer Legacy: programs to prevent smoking related cancers amongst the Yolngu peoples must acknowledge and respect culture and tradition
    Moana Tane, Nindilingarri Cultural Health Services (Australia)

Thursday 14th April 2016 13.30 - 15.00

6.2  Strategies and Frameworks Chaired by Mick Adams, Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet (Australia) and Isabella Wallington, Cancer Australia (Australia)

  1. Improving the Cancer System for First Nation, Inuit, and Métis Populations in Ontario – A Model for Engagement and Building Productive Relationships
    Diana Withrow, Cancer Care Ontario (Canada)
  2. Charting Our Course: Northwest Territories Cancer Strategy 2015-2025
    Crystal Milligan, Department of Health and Social Services, Government of the Northwest Territories (Australia)
  3. Working together to achieve health equity - a Midland experience
    Jan Smith, Midland Cancer Network, HealthShare Limited (Australia)
  4. Translating Aboriginal knowledge into cancer control policy through research: The Cancer Data and Aboriginal Disparities (CanDAD) Project
    Janet Stajic, South Australia Health, South Australia Cancer Service (Australia)
  5. The development of a National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cancer Framework
    Isabella Wallington, Cancer Australia (Australia)

Thursday 14th April 2016 13.30 - 15.00

6.3 Treatment 2 Chaired by Diana Sarfati, University of Otago (New Zealand)

  1. Translating evidence into practice for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with cancer
    Carrie Lethborg, St Vincent’s Hospital (Australia)
  2. The Lived Experience of Anishinaabe People with Cancer: A Focus on Indigenous Healing, Western Medicine and Minobimaadiziwin
    Cindy Peltier, Laurentian University, Centre for Rural and Northern Health Research (Canada)
  3. A retrospective study of causation factors for the gap between Indigenous and Non Indigenous radiotherapy patients in the Northern Territory
    Mary Pennefather, Northern Territory Radiation Oncology (Australia)
  4. Providing Supportive Care to Aboriginal and Torrens Strait Islander Patients by Key Patient Advocates in a Metropolitan Outpatient Setting
    Kelly Skelton, Royal Adelaide Hospital (Australia)
  5. “Doctor, you’re the expert”: Factors influencing treatment decision-making in cancer consultations with Māori patients/whānau
    Jeannine Stairmand, University of Otago (Canada)
  6. Cancer services around Australia for Indigenous Australians: Innovations for better care
    Sandra Thompson, WA Centre for Rural Health, University of Western Australia (Australia)

Thursday 14th April 2016 15.30 - 17.00

Plenary 6 - Priorities moving forward Facilitated by Gail Garvey, Menzies School of Health Research (Australia)

  1. Priorities Moving Forward: Australian Perspective
    Helen Zorbas, Cancer Australia (Australia)
  2. Indigenous people driving the agenda forward
    Romlie Mokak, Lowitja Institute (Australia)
  3. Moving Forward
    Gail Garvey, Menzies School of Health Research (Australia)

Please click here for a comprehensive report on the World Indigenous Cancer Conference 2016.