Please click here to view the Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder Prevention and Health Promotion Resources Package (2017).

Aims:

This project, funded by the Australian Government Department of Health, develop and implement a flexible module package of FASD Prevention and Health Promotion Resources (FPHPR) to reduce the impacts of FASD on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families and young children.

Objectives:
  1. For the FPHPR package to be implemented through the New Directions: Mothers and Babies Services (NDMBS) in community controlled and other health services across Australia
  2. For the package to also address other antenatal health risks (smoking, substance abuse; sexual and reproductive health issues)
  3. For the package to include data collection tools adapted to the needs of NDMBS to facilitate routine collection of nKPI data
  4.  For the package to include a set of discrete FASD education and awareness modules targeting five key NDMBS client groups
Summary:

The Australian Government Department of Health contracted with Menzies to develop and implement a flexible, modular package of FASD Prevention and Health Promotion Resources (FPHPR) to reduce the impacts of FASD on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population.  In partnership with the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation and Telethon Kids Institute, Menzies used a ‘train-the-trainer’ approach to enable services to make the self-assessments needed in tailoring the resources for local circumstances, particularly community needs and local workforce capacity.

The project achieved the following outcomes:

  1. FASD prevention and health promotion resources are available for NDMBS services developing and implementing community-driven strategies and solutions

  2. Education materials targeting clinicians, families and communities on alcohol, smoking & other causes of adverse pregnancy outcomes are more widely available.  

Implications for policy and practice:

The primary benefit of the FPHPR package and training workshops was to enhance health professionals’ capacity to raise the issue of alcohol consumption with antenatal clients, and to provide resources and training tio achieve this outcome. In addition, the NDMBS will be able to use the data collection tools and nKPI indicator to monitor their progress in reducing rates of alcohol consumption in pregnancy in their clients and for continuous quality improvement within their service. Collecting data on alcohol use in pregnancy data will provide a more accurate presentation of this issue in Australia to better inform policy and practice at a national level.

Chief investigators:
  • Professor Sven Silburn (retired)

Key staff:
Contact information:
Project dates:
  • February 2015 – June 2017

Partners
  • NACCHO
  • Telethon Kids Institute
Funders
  • Australian Government, Department of Health
  1. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder Prevention and Health Promotion Resources Project

    Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder Prevention and Health Promotion Resources Project

    Date

    NACCHO has partnered with the Menzies School of Health Research and the Telethon Kids Institute (TKI) to develop and implement health promotion resources and interventions to prevent and reduce the impacts of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD) on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families and young children.

  2. Chair encourages our award-winning health services

    Chair encourages our award-winning health services

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    National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation Chair Matthew Cooke is encouraging all 150 member services to enter this yearís Indigenous Governance Awards (IGA).

  3. Growing up our healthy happy kids

    Growing up our healthy happy kids

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    OUR children are our future which is why it is important to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to grow up healthy happy bubs.

  4. Big tick for three Kimberley health projects

    Big tick for three Kimberley health projects

    Date

    Three Kimberley Aboriginal health projects have been recognised as implementing best practice principles in an independent review of 184 other programs in WA.