Aims:
  • To find out whether a vaccine called Synflorix can prevent repeated flare-ups of Protracted Bacterial Bronchitis, Bronchiectasis and Chronic Suppurative Lung Disease.
  • To look at the effect of the Synflorix vaccine on the amount of Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) children have in their noses, and how well the child's immune system responds to the vaccine.
Summary:

Respiratory diseases that cause children to have a chronic wet cough are an important cause of poor health in children around the world. The most common of these are Protracted Bacterial Bronchitis, Bronchiectasis and Chronic Suppurative Lung Disease. Repeated respiratory flare-ups of these diseases are thought to lead to long term lung damage that can extend into adulthood.

Many of these flare-ups are thought to be caused by a type of bacteria (germ) called non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi). Preventing lung infections caused by NTHi by vaccination would be an important step in helping prevent long term lung damage in children with Protracted Bacterial Bronchitis, Bronchiectasis and Chronic Suppurative Lung Disease.

The CHiRRP study is being conducted in Brisbane, Sydney, Perth and the Northern Territory. Eligible children will receive either two doses of the Synflorix vaccine or a meningococcal vaccine, two months apart and will be then followed for 12 months after the second dose.

Some children get the meningococcal vaccine so that we can compare the amount of flare-ups between children given the Synflorix vaccine and children who do not.

Chief Investigator:  
  • Dr Kerry-Ann O’Grady
Project Manager:
  • Dr Kerry-Ann O’Grady
Contact information:
Project dates:

The project commenced in January 2013 and will be concluded in December 2015.

Funders:
  • National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC).
Collaborators:
  • Kerry-Ann O’Grady, Queensland Children’s Medical Research Institute
  • Anne Chang, Menzies School of Health Research
  • Keith Grimwood, Queensland Children’s Medical Research Institute
  • Peter Morris, Menzies School of Health Research
  • Heidi Smith-Vaughan, Menzies School of Health Research
  • Kim Mulholland, Menzies School of Health Research
  • Paul Torzillo, University of Sydney
  • Alan Cripps, Griffith University
  • Nicolas Wood, University of Sydney
  • Amber Revell, Royal Darwin Hospital.